Anxiety glossary

ANXIETY: "An emotion characterized by feelings of tension, worried thoughts and physical changes like increased blood pressure. People with anxiety disorders usually have recurring intrusive thoughts or concerns. They may avoid certain situations out of worry. They may also have physical symptoms such as sweating, trembling, dizziness or a rapid heartbeat". (American Psychological Association APA)

 

ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD): "A condition with symptoms such as inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. The symptoms differ from person to person. ...Both children and adults can have ADHD, but the symptoms always begin in childhood. Adults with ADHD may have trouble managing time, being organized, setting goals, and holding down a job". (Web-MD)

BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER: "Body dysmorphic disorder is a mental health disorder in which you can't stop thinking about one or more perceived defects or flaws in your appearance — a flaw that appears minor or can't be seen by others. But you may feel so embarrassed, ashamed and anxious that you may avoid many social situations". (Mayo Clinic)

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER (BPD): "A serious mental illness that centers on the inability to manage emotions effectively. The disorder occurs in the context of relationships: sometimes all relationships are affected, sometimes only one. It usually begins during adolescence or early adulthood". (National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder)

COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY (CBT): "CBT is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave. It's most commonly used to treat anxiety..." (NHS)

DEPRESSION: "Depression is a common mental disorder affecting more than 264 million people worldwide. It is characterized by persistent sadness and a lack of interest or pleasure in previously rewarding or enjoyable activities.  It can also disturb sleep and appetite; tiredness and poor concentration are common". (WHO)

EATING DISORDERS: "An eating disorder is when you have an unhealthy attitude to food, which can take over your life and make you ill. It can involve eating too much or too little, or becoming obsessed with your weight and body shape. Men and women of any age can get an eating disorder, but they most commonly affect young women aged 13 to 17 years old". (NHS) Eating disorders include: "anorexia nervosa – when you try to keep your weight as low as possible by not eating enough food, exercising too much, or both; bulimia – when you sometimes lose control and eat a lot of food in a very short amount of time (binging) and are then deliberately sick, use laxatives (medicine to help you poo), restrict what you eat, or do too much exercise to try to stop yourself gaining weight; binge eating disorder (BED) – when you regularly lose control of your eating, eat large portions of food all at once until you feel uncomfortably full, and are then often upset or guilty". (NHS)

GENERALISED ANXIETY (GAD): "GAD is characterized by persistent and excessive worry about a number of different things. People with GAD may anticipate disaster and may be overly concerned about money, health, family, work, or other issues. Individuals with GAD find it difficult to control their worry". (ADAA)

LEARNING DISABILITY: "A reduced intellectual ability and difficulty with everyday activities – for example household tasks, socialising or managing money – which affects someone for their whole life.

People with a learning disability tend to take longer to learn and may need support to develop new skills, understand complicated information and interact with other people". (Mencap)

OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD): "A disorder in which people have recurring, unwanted thoughts, ideas or sensations (obsessions) that make them feel driven to do something repetitively (compulsions). The repetitive behaviors, such as hand washing, checking on things or cleaning, can significantly interfere with a person’s daily activities and social interactions". (American Psychiatric Association)

PANIC DISORDER: "Panic disorder is diagnosed in people who experience spontaneous seemingly out-of-the-blue panic attacks and are very preoccupied with the fear of a recurring attack. Panic attacks occur unexpectedly, sometimes even when waking up from sleep". (ADAA)

PERSONALITY DISORDERS: "A personality disorder can affect how you cope with life, manage relationships, and feel emotionally. You may find that your beliefs and ways of dealing with day-to-day life are different from others. You can find it difficult to change them. You may find your emotions confusing, tiring, and hard to control. This can be distressing for you and others. Because it is distressing, you may find that you develop other mental health problems like depression or anxiety". (Rethink)

PHOBIAS: "A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder that causes an individual to experience extreme, irrational fear about a situation, living creature, place, or object". (Medical News Today)

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD): "PTSD is a type of anxiety disorder which you may develop after being involved in, or witnessing, traumatic events... If you are given a diagnosis of PTSD, you might be told that you have mild, moderate or severe PTSD. This explains what sort of impact your symptoms are having on you currently... (Mind)

SOCIAL ANXIETY: "Social anxiety disorder (also called social phobia) is a mental health condition. It is an intense, persistent fear of being watched and judged by others. This fear can affect work, school, and your other day-to-day activities. It can even make it hard to make and keep friends". (NIMH)

STRESS: "Stress is the body's reaction to feeling threatened or under pressure. It's very common, can be motivating to help us achieve things in our daily life, and can help us meet the demands of home, work and family life. But too much stress can affect our mood, our body and our relationships – especially when it feels out of our control. It can make us feel anxious and irritable, and affect our self-esteem". (NHS)